Trailer House Remodel 23 photos

An old house trailer on a family ranch in Beeville, Texas was used for decades as an inexpensive weekend getaway. The owners recently retired, sold their house in Corpus Christi, and were moving full time to the ranch. They wanted to invest the money from the sale of the house for their retirement instead of using it to build a new house on the ranch, so they decided to live full-time in the existing trailer house. There were only two problems. The first problem was that the trailer was looking shabby on the outside. The second problem was that the trailer looked..... like a trailer. The solution was to give the trailer a "facelift" and disguise its trailer-like shape.

Since the site was a heritage ranch and the surrounding area was agricultural, we went with a farm-ranch/industrial/agricultural theme reminiscent of barns, sheds, cotton gins and feed mills. We sheathed the entire structure in corrugated Galvalume metal. To break up the long trailer shape we added porches, decks, and a small additions. At the front we added a carport and entry pergola of 6x6 cedar columns and beams. The other ingredients were galvanized pipe and fittings and industrial light fixtures.

Trailer House Remodel

The setting a a fairy tail forest of massive oaks in the middle of a 300-acre ranch.
PHOTO: Ignacio Salas-Humara

Trailer House Remodel

The front has a new carport flanked by a formal entry on the right and a service entry on the left. The new structure is composed of 6x6 cedar columns and beams with exposed 2x6 cedar rafters.
PHOTO: Ignacio Salas-Humara

Trailer House Remodel

The vine-covered pergola leads the visitor up the steps to the deck and the visitor entry. Once it reaches the deck the pergola turns into a covered porch.
PHOTO: Ignacio Salas-Humara

Trailer House Remodel

We added cattle panels on top of the pergola for the vines to grow onto and provide shade below.
PHOTO: Ignacio Salas-Humara

Trailer House Remodel

Railings and gates were made from galvanized pipe and Speed Rail fittings. The owner engineered the self-closing mechanism. The walkways and patios are composed of recycled brick and flagstone.
PHOTO: Ignacio Salas-Humara

Trailer House Remodel

The interior walls and ceilings of the trailer were covered in dark wood paneling and the flooring throughout was sheet vinyl. We didn't have the budget to replace the paneling, so we painted over the wood to lighten up the interior. It made a huge difference.

We replaced the existing small windows with double glass patio doors on three sides of the dining room and added wood decks all around the outside.

A nearby wood flooring contractor had a storage shed filled with oak end pieces and leftovers from many flooring jobs. They were an inexpensive way to floor the entire trailer in real oak.
PHOTO: Ignacio Salas-Humara

Trailer House Remodel

We kept the existing wood deck but added a row of cedar columns and beams that's part of the entry pergola. It is roofed over the entry deck. We also created a bar at the kitchen window.
PHOTO: Ignacio Salas-Humara

Trailer House Remodel

When the pergola structure got to the large oak we notched it around the tree. We replaced the single entry door with twelve feet of glass to connect the inside to the outdoors and make the small living room feel bigger.
PHOTO: Ignacio Salas-Humara

Trailer House Remodel

When the cedar column line got to the existing oak tree, we built around it.
PHOTO: Ignacio Salas-Humara

Trailer House Remodel

This gives you an idea of the ranch site.
PHOTO: Ignacio Salas-Humara

Trailer House Remodel

We added a nook off the living space so the Franklin stove would not take up precious interior space. Not only does it add warmth to the room, but it also frames a large oak in the rear of the house.
PHOTO: Ignacio Salas-Humara

Trailer House Remodel

We added a rear deck around the oak tree for outdoor living and dining with access from the living, dining, and bedrooms.
PHOTO: Ignacio Salas-Humara

Trailer House Remodel

This is the rear or service entrance, which is parallel to the carport. The kitchen door is to the right above the stairs. We designed a built-in trash storage compartment. The owner drops trash bags into rolling bins from deck level, and the trash collector obtains access to the bins from ground level.
PHOTO: Ignacio Salas-Humara

Trailer House Remodel

The main elements of the transformation: Cedar columns, beams, and rafters, and corrugated steel siding and roof. We exposed all the steel connectors. I've got to tell the carpenter to take off the price stickers.
PHOTO: Ignacio Salas-Humara

Trailer House Remodel

Crushed granite pathway leading to the rear of the house.
PHOTO: Ignacio Salas-Humara

Trailer House Remodel

The original trailer was inserted into a stand of old oaks. This gives you an idea how close they are to the house.
PHOTO: Ignacio Salas-Humara

Trailer House Remodel

Rear of house showing dining room and new wood deck and stairs. The railing is stainless steel cable with galvanized pipe handrails.
PHOTO: Ignacio Salas-Humara

Trailer House Remodel

Rear of house.
PHOTO: Ignacio Salas-Humara

Trailer House Remodel

We designed a built-in trash storage compartment. The owner drops trash bags into rolling bins from deck level, and the trash collector obtains access to the bins from the other side at ground level.
PHOTO: Ignacio Salas-Humara

Trailer House Remodel

One of the additions to the trailer is a home office with wrap-around porch. It is a light, airy, serene place to work, with views of pastures and woods on three sides. To light the space we used cheapo outdoor flood light fixtures with compact fluorescent bulbs.
PHOTO: Ignacio Salas-Humara

Trailer House Remodel

View from the carport to the entry drive. The exposed steel connectors, electric conduit, and industrial lights all contribute to the overall industrial farmhouse vibe.
PHOTO: Ignacio Salas-Humara

Trailer House Remodel

This gives you an idea of the wonderful stand of old oaks surrounding the house.
PHOTO: Ignacio Salas-Humara

Trailer House Remodel

There is a pond near the house for swimming, fishing, and canoeing.
PHOTO: Ignacio Salas-Humara